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Compression test methods

Animation of compression test method with a plate

Compression is one of the most common texture tests, especially for food products. Typically a sample is placed on a flat surface and an upper compression platen is lowered into the sample. For a true compression test, the compressed sample is never smaller in diameter than the two compression surfaces. Test are performed by compression to a given force, a given position or a percentage of the original height of the sample. Compression with smaller diameter probes, compress locally and may also induce penetration or puncture.

See FTC's compression test method capabilities.

Test procedures

TPA or Texture Profile Analysis, is a specialized derivative of compression testing. TPA consists of a 4 step test of compression, relaxation, recompression and then a final relaxation. A set of mathematical equations are then used on the resulting data to arrive at numerical values of such texture attributes as hardness, cohesiveness, springiness and chewiness. Compression testing can also be useful in measuring the adhesive or stickiness of the product. It is common in stickiness measurements to compress to a preset degree, hold the position for a given amount of time, and then pull back up quickly to accentuate the adhesive result.

Click here for a video demonstrating compression testing of cheese

The measurement of succulence (juiciness) is also performed by compression, the sample usually measure in bulk. Typically a constant force is applied for a given time and the expressible moisture is measured in a graduated cylinder.

Compression platens come in many different sizes and are made from various materials such as stainless steel, aluminium and plastics. Selection of the proper variant depends upon the product and the test sample's geometry.

Compression testing fixtures

Compression test methodsTPA compression test resultsCompression testing applications in food industries

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My first contact with FTC was through buying texture analyzer equipment as my area of interest is Rheology. We faced a problem operating the appliance. The company tried hard to help us through the internet, but the University thought it was better to send me to the company branch located in England. I received a highly advanced training course for 10 days free of charge. They provided me with programs that operate the equipment along with the information needed.

It was a great effort and outstanding support. I would like to thank Shirl Lakeway and FTC for providing me with this opportunity and for his continuous help. Finally, I encourage researchers who are interested in the physical properties of foods and dairy to choose FTC as it is a respectable and dependable company and offers the best deals concerning prices and training with different languages, such as Arabic for the Middle East.

Professor Hoda El-Zeini, Dairy Science and Agriculture University - Cairo, Egypt
Professor
https://cu.edu.eg

I have been using the TMS-Pro mechanical tester in our undergraduate biological materials property course for the past 3 years. The simple setup and operation of the TMS-Pro allows my students to focus on learning the theoretical underpinnings of mechanical properties instead of fighting with a finicky test system.

An added bonus is working with Shirl and his amazing team at Food Technology Corporation. They respond almost immediately to questions and inquiries and are always friendly and helpful. 

Jennifer (Melander) Keshwani, Ph.D. University of Nebraska-Lincoln
http://www.unl.edu/

Excellent customer service. Consistently followed up and offered help without asking. Relatively low priced - provides good value. 

Easy to switch different load cells. Used it for 5 lab sessions for 68 students this semester and performed well.

 

 

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https://nebraska.edu/