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Extrusion Fixtures

Extrusion fixturesExtrusion can be divided into two categories; forward extrusion and back extrusion.
Forward extrusion is when the test sample is placed into a confined container and then forced through an orifice or grid.

Back extrusion is typically performed with the product being measured is placed in an open top cylinder and a piston with a smaller diameter, is forced down into the sample, such that it flows back upwards, though the space between the piston and the cylinder. In both extrusion test methods, the resistance to flow is being measured, valuable in the study of the rheology of the product.
extrusion

Extrusion is also used to measure the spreadability of a product, where the piston and cylinder is replaced by a conical probe and a receptacle of matching geometry. The surface is initially penetrated before extrusion forces the product back around the probe to allow measurement of the resistance to spreading.

FTC extrusion fixtures and accessories enable the rheological property testing of semi-solid and viscous liquids by all of these methodologies and their impact on acceptable texture measured.

Some of the texture attributes measured by extrusion may also be analyzed by testing the product in its own container - more closely representing the interaction with the conumer, or free standing – with the use of shaped probes, for example a cone-shaped probe.

 

Typical products tested Texture characteristics
  • Fruit purées - to assess pumpability
  • Fruit topping, with particulates - to optimize viscosity
  • Mayonnaise and thick sauces - to correlate with mouthfeel
  • Personal care products - to quantify functional structure
  • Pumpable fats - to measure shear thinning
  • Starch pastes - to assess thickening
  • Thick soups and sauces quality for ready prepared foods
  • Weak hydrocolloid gels - to assess thickening
  • Whipped creams - to measure stability
  • Yogurts - to measure effect of formulation changes
  • Adhesiveness
  • Consistency
  • Flow
  • Internal structure
  • Mouthfeel
  • Stringiness
  • Thickness
  • Thinning
  • Yield Point
  • Viscosity effects

Texture analysis glossary

Trusted by customers across the world

The University of Arizona’s Nutritional Sciences Food Lab acquired a Texture Analyzer from Food Technologies about 5 years ago. The company has a great product, which is tailored to food needs. 

We have used the Texture Analyzer for both research projects and as a tool to demonstrate to students how food manufacturers can employ objective testing in product evaluation to show how differing ingredients in the same product can affect quality attributes. Its use adds another dimension to the foods labs.

Drew Lambert has been instrumental in helping with set up for testing and providing support whenever there’s a question. He has been a pleasure to work with and is always accommodating with our needs and schedules.  He has even sent us special attachments for special projects.  We couldn’t ask for a better technical support.  Thanks for a great product and great service.

Patricia Sparks, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Practice
https://www.arizona.edu

Excellent customer service. Consistently followed up and offered help without asking. Relatively low priced - provides good value. 

Easy to switch different load cells. Used it for 5 lab sessions for 68 students this semester and performed well.

 

 

Professor Jeyam Subbiah, University of Nebraska
https://nebraska.edu/

Service, equipment and people are all first class with Food Technology Corporation.

Questions and problems are handled quickly, which is something that is hard to find in today’s business environment.

 

 

 

David Smith, Riviana Foods Inc.
http://www.riviana.com/